CORRIDOR “The corridor has been lost to safety codes and the open plan of the 20th century. The corridor is “meant to be used only in a state of panic for exiting a building... banished from Architecture as a scenographic and social tool, corridors are still everywhere in buildings, just behind the scenes.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES If corridors are to remain the artery for directing people in a state of panic, could motion sensors help to direct occupants to the nearest exit? Could corridors embedded with position or pressure sensors monitor occupant wayfinding through a space ensuring that exit points are used most efficiently?

CORRIDOR “The corridor has been lost to safety codes and the open plan of the 20th century. The corridor is “meant to be used only in a state of panic for exiting a building… banished from Architecture as a scenographic and social tool, corridors are still everywhere in buildings, just behind the scenes.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES If corridors are to remain the artery for directing people in a state of panic, could motion sensors help to direct occupants to the nearest exit? Could corridors embedded with position or pressure sensors monitor occupant wayfinding through a space ensuring that exit points are used most efficiently?

FAÇADE “The façade, though a relatively young concept, is the architectural element most invested with aesthetic, political and cultural meaning. Technological advances in the 20th century - bigger glass, the curtain wall, silicone, air conditioning - transform the façade into a seamless and perfectly sealed wrapper, no longer a careful composition of elements (windows, balconies, doors, roof) and functional ornamentation (columns for structure, stringcourses for rain protection) but a monolithic, all-over composition.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES Outside the sensors associated with glass that may be embedded in a curtain wall, what sensors could be included in a façade, that in turn could present an output that is representative of a population’s collective aesthetic, political or cultural circumstance?

FAÇADE “The façade, though a relatively young concept, is the architectural element most invested with aesthetic, political and cultural meaning. Technological advances in the 20th century – bigger glass, the curtain wall, silicone, air conditioning – transform the façade into a seamless and perfectly sealed wrapper, no longer a careful composition of elements (windows, balconies, doors, roof) and functional ornamentation (columns for structure, stringcourses for rain protection) but a monolithic, all-over composition.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES Outside the sensors associated with glass that may be embedded in a curtain wall, what sensors could be included in a façade, that in turn could present an output that is representative of a population’s collective aesthetic, political or cultural circumstance?

RAMP Tim Nugent, born 1923, declared the universal necessity of adapting the ramp to facilitate every type of human body. The ramp symbolises Nugent’s Project 117.1. A call for the establishment of architectural design guidelines dedicated to the physically disabled. What added attributes could be added to the ramp element, to help in ease of use and to inform design and guidelines? ADDED ATTRIBUTES Could motion sensors be added to ramps in order to improve accessibility and inform design and guidelines? Or position and pressure sensors to monitor for falls or accidents, triggering a series of events to send aid?

RAMP Tim Nugent, born 1923, declared the universal necessity of adapting the ramp to facilitate every type of human body. The ramp symbolises Nugent’s Project 117.1. A call for the establishment of architectural design guidelines dedicated to the physically disabled. What added attributes could be added to the ramp element, to help in ease of use and to inform design and guidelines? ADDED ATTRIBUTES Could motion sensors be added to ramps in order to improve accessibility and inform design and guidelines? Or position and pressure sensors to monitor for falls or accidents, triggering a series of events to send aid?

BALCONY “The balcony projects into the outside but floats above it. It is cellular and isolated; yet by design it pushed beyond the individual compartment. The balcony serves as a laboratory where sometimes explosive mixtures of public and private inside and outside, are tested.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The balcony represents a space that can be used to compare conditions between inside and out Environmental sensors placed inside a space and just outside, at the same level allow comparisons to be made.

BALCONY “The balcony projects into the outside but floats above it. It is cellular and isolated; yet by design it pushed beyond the individual compartment. The balcony serves as a laboratory where sometimes explosive mixtures of public and private inside and outside, are tested.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The balcony represents a space that can be used to compare conditions between inside and out Environmental sensors placed inside a space and just outside, at the same level allow comparisons to be made.

STAIR “Considered dangerous - and possibly endangered, only still in existence in order to fulfils the requirements of having an exit strategy... though the stair may be making something of a comeback as an aid to fitness and an energy-saving alternative to the elevator.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES If stairs are indeed ‘making a comeback’ but ‘considered dangerous’ then sensors relating to movement and proximity are most likely to occur. They could also be used to monitor the movement of people in an emergency.

STAIR “Considered dangerous – and possibly endangered, only still in existence in order to fulfils the requirements of having an exit strategy… though the stair may be making something of a comeback as an aid to fitness and an energy-saving alternative to the elevator.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES If stairs are indeed ‘making a comeback’ but ‘considered dangerous’ then sensors relating to movement and proximity are most likely to occur. They could also be used to monitor the movement of people in an emergency.

FIREPLACE “As our mastery of fire has improved, the former tasks of the fireplace - heating, cooking, lighting, a gathering place and focal point for media and culture - have been divided up among multiple discrete devices, and/or dispersed like tentacles through systems that penetrate every hidden space of architecture and lead eventually to power stations (enormous fireplaces)” ADDED ATTRIBUTES If Koolhaas is correct in that the fireplace is ‘functionally extinct,’ at least in the Western world. Perhaps sensors will first make their way into the ‘multiple discrete devices,’ where they haven’t already done so. Or perhaps sensors will help return the burning fireplace to the ‘visible entropy’ as something more pleasing.

FIREPLACE “As our mastery of fire has improved, the former tasks of the fireplace – heating, cooking, lighting, a gathering place and focal point for media and culture – have been divided up among multiple discrete devices, and/or dispersed like tentacles through systems that penetrate every hidden space of architecture and lead eventually to power stations (enormous fireplaces)” ADDED ATTRIBUTES If Koolhaas is correct in that the fireplace is ‘functionally extinct,’ at least in the Western world. Perhaps sensors will first make their way into the ‘multiple discrete devices,’ where they haven’t already done so. Or perhaps sensors will help return the burning fireplace to the ‘visible entropy’ as something more pleasing.

CEILING “Ceilings over the last 100 years have become increasingly thicker, required to house HVAC, plumbing, wiring surveillance in an otherwise inaccessible space. In the 21st century, a desire to erase the encrustations of modernism has led to a new dogma: the true ceiling, with protective panelling removed and the concrete slab and the entrails of the building left exposed.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES If ceilings continue to become ‘true ceilings’ where will the sensors inevitably make their way to? Perhaps the sensors will make their way to the more obvious and more easily measured services that the ceiling was hiding in the 20th century (where they haven’t already.)

CEILING “Ceilings over the last 100 years have become increasingly thicker, required to house HVAC, plumbing, wiring surveillance in an otherwise inaccessible space. In the 21st century, a desire to erase the encrustations of modernism has led to a new dogma: the true ceiling, with protective panelling removed and the concrete slab and the entrails of the building left exposed.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES If ceilings continue to become ‘true ceilings’ where will the sensors inevitably make their way to? Perhaps the sensors will make their way to the more obvious and more easily measured services that the ceiling was hiding in the 20th century (where they haven’t already.)

ROOF “Of all the elements, the roof seems the most fundamental in man’s transition from hunter-gatherer to civilization - or so generations of writers, theorists and archaeologists suggest.” Sustainability colours our roofs blue (photovoltaics), green (vegetation), and white (reflective) ADDED ATTRIBUTES If Koolhaas is right in that our roofs are being coloured by sustainability what added sensors could be added to the roof to monitor the elements.

ROOF “Of all the elements, the roof seems the most fundamental in man’s transition from hunter-gatherer to civilization – or so generations of writers, theorists and archaeologists suggest.” Sustainability colours our roofs blue (photovoltaics), green (vegetation), and white (reflective) ADDED ATTRIBUTES If Koolhaas is right in that our roofs are being coloured by sustainability what added sensors could be added to the roof to monitor the elements.

ESCALATOR “The escalator is, at first, literally an attraction at the great expositions of the turn of the century. Seamless assisted ascent becomes a universal standard for shoppers. The escalator’s placid movement makes possible the transition from industrial to consumer capitalism, by enabling the shopping mall, as well as the transition from town to metropolis, by knitting together the unforgivingly immense spaces of mass transit.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The nature of escalators will almost definitely mean they will be subject to position sensors, that is movement, location and proximity. The commercial placement of escalators means that they will be targeted by advertisers (one might think of London underground’s plethora of stage show commercials). Which may mean the embedding of the likes of RFID scanners.

ESCALATOR “The escalator is, at first, literally an attraction at the great expositions of the turn of the century. Seamless assisted ascent becomes a universal standard for shoppers. The escalator’s placid movement makes possible the transition from industrial to consumer capitalism, by enabling the shopping mall, as well as the transition from town to metropolis, by knitting together the unforgivingly immense spaces of mass transit.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The nature of escalators will almost definitely mean they will be subject to position sensors, that is movement, location and proximity. The commercial placement of escalators means that they will be targeted by advertisers (one might think of London underground’s plethora of stage show commercials). Which may mean the embedding of the likes of RFID scanners.

ELEVATOR As the enabler of the skyscraper and the modern metropolis, the elevator’s origins first in the mining industry and later in theatre scenography were mostly forgotten as it disappeared into the core. Inside the car, as a voluntary captive for a limited period of tine, users are stuck in a random sampling of mankind - a freeze-frame of the city. ADDED ATTRIBUTES Like the escalator or toilet, the elevator, compared with other elements is deeply in the hands of its manufactures. Is the role of the sensor embedded elevator to minimise the time spent in said elevator? Or is the time spent ‘stuck in a random sampling of mankind,’ the perfect time for commercial vendors to target shoppers based on the items that have been ‘sensed.’ Maybe shoppers are subconsciously steered to one floor based on their shopping habits or targeted with personal advertising whilst trapped in the space. Maybe an elevator ride will instead turn into the time it takes to complete a 30 seconds pitch.

ELEVATOR As the enabler of the skyscraper and the modern metropolis, the elevator’s origins first in the mining industry and later in theatre scenography were mostly forgotten as it disappeared into the core. Inside the car, as a voluntary captive for a limited period of tine, users are stuck in a random sampling of mankind – a freeze-frame of the city. ADDED ATTRIBUTES Like the escalator or toilet, the elevator, compared with other elements is deeply in the hands of its manufactures. Is the role of the sensor embedded elevator to minimise the time spent in said elevator? Or is the time spent ‘stuck in a random sampling of mankind,’ the perfect time for commercial vendors to target shoppers based on the items that have been ‘sensed.’ Maybe shoppers are subconsciously steered to one floor based on their shopping habits or targeted with personal advertising whilst trapped in the space. Maybe an elevator ride will instead turn into the time it takes to complete a 30 seconds pitch.

TOILET “The toilet is the fundamental zone of interaction - on the most intimate levelbetween humans and architecture. We can imagine buildings without almost any of the other elements of architecture but not without the toilet. But... the model it depends on - abundant water, sophisticated plumbing, largescale sewage systems - is increasingly unsustainable and unaffordable.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The toilet represents the most intimate link between buildings and their occupants. Aside from the obvious sensors regarding water and sustainability, the toilet is an excellent element to monitor health. Toilets might be able to be used for early warning in a range of diseases. As always, how the data is used is what becomes interesting, a doctor will use ‘toilet data’ different to that of an insurance company for example.

TOILET “The toilet is the fundamental zone of interaction – on the most intimate levelbetween humans and architecture. We can imagine buildings without almost any of the other elements of architecture but not without the toilet. But… the model it depends on – abundant water, sophisticated plumbing, largescale sewage systems – is increasingly unsustainable and unaffordable.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The toilet represents the most intimate link between buildings and their occupants. Aside from the obvious sensors regarding water and sustainability, the toilet is an excellent element to monitor health. Toilets might be able to be used for early warning in a range of diseases. As always, how the data is used is what becomes interesting, a doctor will use ‘toilet data’ different to that of an insurance company for example.

FLOOR “Once a surface for symbolic expression - defining the way spaces are used - floors in the 20th century tended towards a purely cartisian surface, rational, undecorated, unloved, always perfectly flat, ideally soundless. Floorspace became the dominant economic metaphor for architectural space: call it square meterism. But the square meter, in the parlance of real estate, is really a three-dimensions volume through the entire space.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES Pressure and position sensors embedded in a floor, tracking how one person, or one group of people use a space (in plan) could aid in both design but also assist in the ‘parlance of real estate,’ allowing developers to continue to minimise what is considered as reasonably sized space to live and work. This data could be compared alongside, say data on occupant satisfaction. There are also many possibilities to study way-finding in cities for example, how people might move through the likes of a gallery or shopping mall, or how people respond to street furniture, different floor textures, materials etc

FLOOR “Once a surface for symbolic expression – defining the way spaces are used – floors in the 20th century tended towards a purely cartisian surface, rational, undecorated, unloved, always perfectly flat, ideally soundless. Floorspace became the dominant economic metaphor for architectural space: call it square meterism. But the square meter, in the parlance of real estate, is really a three-dimensions volume through the entire space.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES Pressure and position sensors embedded in a floor, tracking how one person, or one group of people use a space (in plan) could aid in both design but also assist in the ‘parlance of real estate,’ allowing developers to continue to minimise what is considered as reasonably sized space to live and work. This data could be compared alongside, say data on occupant satisfaction. There are also many possibilities to study way-finding in cities for example, how people might move through the likes of a gallery or shopping mall, or how people respond to street furniture, different floor textures, materials etc

WALL “Walls provide structure and divide space: the load-bearing wall, separating roof from ground, and the contingent partition wall, organizing movement within the resulting container. The former is seemingly as stable as the human need for shelter; the latter as changeable as our forms of sociability... the partition is now in the ascendency.. With the advance of technology, the wall, no matter how temporary or flimsy, becomes permeated with wiring and plumbing, insulation and acoustic engineering, fire protection technology and sensors - even outwardly it becomes increasingly bare, minimal, even transparent...” ADDED ATTRIBUTES Koolhaas has noted that even the most flimsy wall is subject to sensors. He also notes that they are becoming increasingly bare, even transparent. But in a world where technology is becoming cheaper, the wall seems the likely surface to replace the computer monitor. Not only will walls be sensing in their own right, they will likely be the means of broadcasting the data of our built environments.

WALL “Walls provide structure and divide space: the load-bearing wall, separating roof from ground, and the contingent partition wall, organizing movement within the resulting container. The former is seemingly as stable as the human need for shelter; the latter as changeable as our forms of sociability… the partition is now in the ascendency.. With the advance of technology, the wall, no matter how temporary or flimsy, becomes permeated with wiring and plumbing, insulation and acoustic engineering, fire protection technology and sensors – even outwardly it becomes increasingly bare, minimal, even transparent…” ADDED ATTRIBUTES Koolhaas has noted that even the most flimsy wall is subject to sensors. He also notes that they are becoming increasingly bare, even transparent. But in a world where technology is becoming cheaper, the wall seems the likely surface to replace the computer monitor. Not only will walls be sensing in their own right, they will likely be the means of broadcasting the data of our built environments.

WINDOW “Glass, which initially seemed the perfect partner for the window, took over entirely... the former accoutrements of the window - shading devices, bars for security, handles with which to open the window - are internalised in the glass itself, becoming invisible, or discarded entirely.. Glass controls solar gain and radiation, provides unrivalled insulation, generates energy, and conveys digitised information... Fewer and fewer windows can be opened, offering enormous uninterrupted views of the world but no physical contact with it..” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The window (or glass) is already self tinting based on external outputs, windows can already open on their own , they can already control an environment based on external uses. Perhaps the discussion of windows should turn to the outcome rather than the sensors. If sensors can already control the tint of windows, will they also be able to control the image of the outside world? A commercial data holder might use this space to market a new product whilst an authoritarian government might use the space as a means to control what is viewed.

WINDOW “Glass, which initially seemed the perfect partner for the window, took over entirely… the former accoutrements of the window – shading devices, bars for security, handles with which to open the window – are internalised in the glass itself, becoming invisible, or discarded entirely.. Glass controls solar gain and radiation, provides unrivalled insulation, generates energy, and conveys digitised information… Fewer and fewer windows can be opened, offering enormous uninterrupted views of the world but no physical contact with it..” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The window (or glass) is already self tinting based on external outputs, windows can already open on their own , they can already control an environment based on external uses. Perhaps the discussion of windows should turn to the outcome rather than the sensors. If sensors can already control the tint of windows, will they also be able to control the image of the outside world? A commercial data holder might use this space to market a new product whilst an authoritarian government might use the space as a means to control what is viewed.

DOOR Koolhaas concedes that the door has already turned into a de-materialised zone, a gradual transition between conditions registered by ephemeral technologies (biometric detectors, body scanners) rather than physical barriers. “Isolation was once the desired condition, our professed aspirations now are for the movement, flow, transparency, accessibility - while maintaining the utmost security... a paradox that the door is charged with resolving.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The sensor door may already exist in our airports and checkpoints. What is touted as a means to ensure security when crossing from one country (threshold) to another may be marketed as a means of convenience. What if every door stored the data of who and what passed through its threshold. Be it people, animals or items.

DOOR Koolhaas concedes that the door has already turned into a de-materialised zone, a gradual transition between conditions registered by ephemeral technologies (biometric detectors, body scanners) rather than physical barriers. “Isolation was once the desired condition, our professed aspirations now are for the movement, flow, transparency, accessibility – while maintaining the utmost security… a paradox that the door is charged with resolving.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The sensor door may already exist in our airports and checkpoints. What is touted as a means to ensure security when crossing from one country (threshold) to another may be marketed as a means of convenience. What if every door stored the data of who and what passed through its threshold. Be it people, animals or items.