DOOR Koolhaas concedes that the door has already turned into a de-materialised zone, a gradual transition between conditions registered by ephemeral technologies (biometric detectors, body scanners) rather than physical barriers. “Isolation was once the desired condition, our professed aspirations now are for the movement, flow, transparency, accessibility - while maintaining the utmost security... a paradox that the door is charged with resolving.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The sensor door may already exist in our airports and checkpoints. What is touted as a means to ensure security when crossing from one country (threshold) to another may be marketed as a means of convenience. What if every door stored the data of who and what passed through its threshold. Be it people, animals or items.

DOOR Koolhaas concedes that the door has already turned into a de-materialised zone, a gradual transition between conditions registered by ephemeral technologies (biometric detectors, body scanners) rather than physical barriers. “Isolation was once the desired condition, our professed aspirations now are for the movement, flow, transparency, accessibility – while maintaining the utmost security… a paradox that the door is charged with resolving.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES The sensor door may already exist in our airports and checkpoints. What is touted as a means to ensure security when crossing from one country (threshold) to another may be marketed as a means of convenience. What if every door stored the data of who and what passed through its threshold. Be it people, animals or items.