FLOOR “Once a surface for symbolic expression - defining the way spaces are used - floors in the 20th century tended towards a purely cartisian surface, rational, undecorated, unloved, always perfectly flat, ideally soundless. Floorspace became the dominant economic metaphor for architectural space: call it square meterism. But the square meter, in the parlance of real estate, is really a three-dimensions volume through the entire space.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES Pressure and position sensors embedded in a floor, tracking how one person, or one group of people use a space (in plan) could aid in both design but also assist in the ‘parlance of real estate,’ allowing developers to continue to minimise what is considered as reasonably sized space to live and work. This data could be compared alongside, say data on occupant satisfaction. There are also many possibilities to study way-finding in cities for example, how people might move through the likes of a gallery or shopping mall, or how people respond to street furniture, different floor textures, materials etc

FLOOR “Once a surface for symbolic expression – defining the way spaces are used – floors in the 20th century tended towards a purely cartisian surface, rational, undecorated, unloved, always perfectly flat, ideally soundless. Floorspace became the dominant economic metaphor for architectural space: call it square meterism. But the square meter, in the parlance of real estate, is really a three-dimensions volume through the entire space.” ADDED ATTRIBUTES Pressure and position sensors embedded in a floor, tracking how one person, or one group of people use a space (in plan) could aid in both design but also assist in the ‘parlance of real estate,’ allowing developers to continue to minimise what is considered as reasonably sized space to live and work. This data could be compared alongside, say data on occupant satisfaction. There are also many possibilities to study way-finding in cities for example, how people might move through the likes of a gallery or shopping mall, or how people respond to street furniture, different floor textures, materials etc